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Check for student’s concept and functional use of the conjunction ‘and’ prior to introducing conjoined sentences. Conjunctions are words that can be use to connect  nouns, verbs, clauses or sentences or to coordinate words in the same clause (e.g. and, but, if )

Sentences conjoined with and
Slash lv. 3
 
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Strategy

Teacher actions are highlighted

  • Prepare a chart/ display with three pairs of sentences, for example:

    • Mom made some soup in a pot.

    • Dad ate the soup for lunch.

    • Dad bumped the table.

    • The soup splashed out of the bowl.

    • Dad tasted the soup.

    • It was very hot.

  • Students read the first pair of sentences.

    • Tell students that the sentences are short, but they can be combined into longer sentences that are more interesting.

    • The sentences can be combined using the word 'and'.

  • Under the first pair of sentences

    • Write:

      • Mom made some soup.

      • Dad ate the soup for lunch.

      • Mom made some soup and Dad ate the soup for lunch.

  • Tell students that the first two sentences are short, but when the two sentences are combined with 'and', the sentences become one long sentence.

  • Ask the students if the new sentence means the same as the pair of sentences.

  • Present the second pair of sentences.

    • Dad bumped the table. The soup splashed out of the bowl.

    • Students read the sentences and tell how to combine the sentences.

    • Write a response on the board: Dad bumped the table and the soup splashed out of the bowl.

  • Continue with the same steps for the third pair of sentences.

 
Advancing the Strategy
  • Prepare a chart with 3-4 pairs of sentences. For example:

  • Mom gave Dad a cloth.

  • Dad cleaned up the soup.

  • Bella went out the door.

  • Tony went out, too.

  • Bella sat down near a tree.

  • Tony sat down, too.

  • Students can work together to combine the short sentences and write the conjoined sentence underneath the pair.

  • Students read stories that include frequent uses of the targeted structure.

  • Incorporate the targeted structure into language experience stories and all other activities during the school day and emphasize its use.

  • Encourage the children to use the targeted structure whenever appropriate throughout the day in speech/sign/writing.

  • Identify conjoined phrases in realted books.