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Comprehension Rating
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Upper elementary and above

  • Comprehension

  • Focus on meaning

  • Monitor comprehension

  • Metacognitive skills

Strategy Steps: Part I

Step 1:

  • Teacher models comprehension monitoring while reading aloud to students

    •  I don't understand this paragraph, so I'll read on.

    • This paragraph doesn't make sense. I need to read it again.

Step 2:

  • Students are given single sentences to read and rate for comprehension.

    • Some sentences make sense.

    • Some sentences do not make sense.

      • Some sentences contain nonsense words.

      • Some sentences contain faulty logic.

    • Students work independently or with partners.

      • Students rate their comprehension of each sentence.

        • Students put a (+) in front of the sentence if they understand it.

        • Students put a (-) in front of the sentence if they don't understand it.

  • When students finish rating each sentence, they discuss the reasons for their ratings.

  • When students are successful rating sentences, give them paragraphs to read and rate for comprehension.

    • Some paragraphs make sense

    • Some don't make sense because they contain some nonsense words or faulty logic.

    • Students work independently or with partners and rate the paragraphs in the same manner they used to rate sentences.

  • When students finish, they discuss the reasons for their ratings.

 
Strategy Steps: Part II

Step 3:

  • Students use a 3-point comprehension rating task using sentences, paragraphs, and then longer passages.

  • The ratings for the 3-point comprehension rating task are:

    • I understand well. (I have a clear picture in my head and could explain it to someone else.)

    • I understand a little. (I have an incomplete picture in my head and could not explain it to someone else.)

    • I don't understand.

Step 4:

  • When students understand the first 3 steps, teach them how to use fix-up or repair strategies.

  • Teacher presents mini-lessons focused on each repair strategy.

    • Word-level repair strategies

      • Read around the word--maybe student can figure it out from context clues.

      • Use context clues for help in decoding or predicting what a word means.

      • Look for structural clues within words.

      • Sound out words.

      • Use a dictionary.

      • Ask for help.

    • Idea-level repair strategies

      • Read on to make it clear.

      • Reread carefully to make it clearer.

      • Look again at the title, pictures, headings, and graphics.

      • Ask yourself questions.

      • Put ideas into your own words as you go along.

      • Picture the ideas in your head while you read.

      • Relate ideas to your personal experiences.

      • Ask someone to clarify things.

  • Give students a list of the repair strategies.

    • Teacher models each one and provides guided practice and independent practice for the students.

    • Students are encouraged to use strategies when they experience comprehension difficulty during reading.

  • Students make notes or mark places in the text where they used repair strategies.

    • Students later explain to teacher which strategy they used.

    • If student cannot do this independently, teacher works with him/her individually, providing guidance on which repair strategy would be most effective.